The PEN/Faulkner Podcast Series

Welcome to the home of the PEN/Faulkner Podcast, a monthly podcast showcasing author events from our annual Reading Series, as well as occasional clips from our archives.

The PEN/Faulkner Podcast series is made possible by the generous support of Amazon.com, and is co-sponsored by the Folger Shakespeare Library.

Click on the  links below to hear or download the podcast series.

 

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Episode 32 – 2014 PEN/Faulkner Award Ceremony

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Episode 32 features the 34th Annual PEN/Faulkner Award Ceremony & Reading, which was held at the Folger Shakespeare Library here in Washington, DC on May 10th, 2014.

The winner of this year’s award was Karen Joy Fowler for her novel We Are All Completely Beside Ourselves, and the four finalists for the prize were: Daniel Alarcón for his novel At Night We Walk in Circles; Percival Everett for his novel Percival Everett by Virgil Russell; Joan Silber for her collection of short stories Fools; Valerie Trueblood for her collection of short stories Search Party: Stories of Rescue.

All five of the authors joined us at the Folger for the ceremony and reading, and they were joined onstage by this year’s judges, Achy Obejas, Manuel Muñoz, and Madison Smartt Bell, who you’ll hear read their citations for each finalist and the winner.

The event opened with remarks by Frazier O’Leary, president of PEN/Faulkner’s Board of Directors, Emma Snyder, our Executive Director. The Master of Ceremonies for the event was PBS’s Jeffrey Brown.

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Episode 31 – Rebecca Mead in Conversation with Hanna Rosin & Margaret Talbot

Rebecca Mead (upper right), Hanna Rosin (lower left), and Margaret Talbot (lower right)

Episode 31 of the podcast brings you a reading by New Yorker Staff Writer and author Rebecca Mead discussing her book My Life in Middlemarch and engaging in a conversation about the book with the Atlantic’s Hanna Rosin and the New Yorker’s Margaret Talbot.

Rebecca Mead was a young woman in an English coastal town when she first read George Eliot’s Middlemarch, regarded by many as the greatest English novel. After gaining admission to Oxford, and moving to the United States to become a journalist, through several love affairs, then marriage and family, Mead read and reread Middlemarch. The novel, which Virginia Woolf famously described as “one of the few English novels written for grown-up people,” offered Mead something that modern life and literature did not.

In this wise and revealing work of biography, reporting, and memoir, Rebecca Mead leads us into the life that the book made for her, as well as the many lives the novel has led since it was written. Employing a structure that deftly mirrors that of the novel, My Life in Middlemarch takes the themes of Eliot’s masterpiece–the complexity of love, the meaning of marriage, the foundations of morality, and the drama of aspiration and failure–and brings them into our world. Offering both a fascinating reading of Eliot’s biography and an exploration of the way aspects of Mead’s life uncannily echo that of Eliot herself, My Life in Middlemarch is for every ardent lover of literature who cares about why we read books, and how they read us.

Hanna Rosin is the author of the recent book The End of Men. A senior editor at The Atlantic, she has written for The New YorkerThe New York TimesGQThe New Republic, and The Washington Post, among other publications.

Margaret Talbot has been a staff writer at The New Yorker magazine, where she covers culture and politics, since 2003. Her first book, The Entertainer: Movies, Magic, and my Father’s Twentieth Century, recounts the story of her father’s (stage and screen actor Lyle Talbot) exceptionally long and varied career from 1931-1960.

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Episode 30: Two Lives in Language – Amy Tan & Deborah Tannen in Conversation

Amy Tan & Deborah Tannen - compositeEpisode 30 features an event we called “Two Lives in Language: Amy Tan & Deborah Tannen in Conversation.” The bestselling authors and longtime friends read from their work, discussed their relationship to the written word, and explored the ways in which their interests and careers have intersected over the long course of their friendship.

Amy Tan is the author of The Joy Luck ClubThe Kitchen God’s WifeThe Hundred Secret SensesThe Bonesetter’s DaughterThe Opposite of Fate: Memories of a Writing Life, and two children’s books, The Moon Lady andSagwa, which has now been adapted as a PBS production. Her work has been translated into thirty-five languages. She lives with her husband in San Francisco and New York.

Deborah Tannen’s books include You Just Don’t Understand: Women and Men in ConversationYou’re Wearing THAT? (about mothers and daughters), Talking from 9 to 5 (about workplace communication), I Only Say This Because I Love You (about adult family relationships), and You Were Always Mom’s Favorite! (about sisters). She has also published poems, short stories, and personal essays. Her play “An Act of Devotion” is included in Best American Short Plays 1993– 1994. She is professor of linguistics at Georgetown University.

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Episode 29: The Heart of Things Human: Richard Ford in Conversation with Ron Charles

Ford Charles Composite for Podcast

Episode 29 features our April 10th event: The Heart of Things Human: An Evening with Richard Ford. The author was joined onstage at the Lutheran Church of the Reformation in Washington, DC by the Washington Post‘s Ron Charles for an evening of discussion about Ford’s life and work. Ford read from his forthcoming work Let Me Be Frank With You, in which the author returns to the story of Frank Bascombe, the protagonist of three previous novels.

Richard Ford has published seven novels and four collections of stories, including The Sportswriter, Independence Day, A Multitude of Sins and, most recently, Canada. Independence Day was awarded the Pulitzer Prize and the PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction, the first time the same book had won both prizes. Richard Ford lives in Maine with his wife, Kristina Ford.

Ron Charles (moderator) is the deputy editor of the Washington Post’s book section and a weekly fiction critic. Before coming to the Post, he was the Books Editor at the Christian Science Monitor. His reviews have won the National Book Critics Circle Award for best criticism and 1st place for Arts & Entertainment Commentary from the Society for Features Journalism. He and his wife, an English teacher, live in Bethesda, Md.

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Episode 28: Phil Klay in Conversation with Jennifer Vanderbes

Klay (left) and Vanderbes (right) - black and white author photos

Episode 28 features a reading by Phil Klay, author of the story collection Redeployment, in conversation with novelist Jennifer Vanderbes, which took place at Hill Center at Old Naval Hospital in Washington, DC on March 14, 2014.

Phil Klay is a graduate of Dartmouth College and a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. He served in Iraq’s Anbar Province from January 2007 to February 2008 as a Public Affairs Officer. After being discharged he went to Hunter College and received an MFA. His writing has appeared in the New York Times, Granta, Newsweek, the Daily Beast, the New York Daily News, Tin House, and The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2012. Redeployment is his first book.

Jennifer Vanderbes is the author of the acclaimed novels Easter Island, Strangers at the Feast and, most recently, the The Secret of Raven Point which is set during World War II and explores moral ambiguities of war. She is a graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, and is the recipient of numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship. Her essays and reviews have appeared in the New York Times, the Washington Post, and the Atlantic.

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